Recovery From Accessory Navicular Bone Removal

Overview

The accessory navicular is a congenital anomaly, meaning that you are born with the extra bone. As the skeleton completely matures, the navicular and the accessory navicular never completely grow, or fuse, into one solid bone. The two bones are joined by fibrous tissue or cartilage. Girls seem to be more likely to have an accessory navicular than boys.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes

This painful foot condition is caused by an extra bone in the foot called the accessory navicular. Only about 10% of people have this bone (4 to 21%), and not all of them will develop any symptoms. The navicular bone is one of the normal tarsal bones of the foot. It is located on the inside of the foot, at the arch.

Symptoms

The main symptom of an aggravated accessory navicular is pain, particularly in the instep. Walking can sometimes be difficult, and tight shoes may worsen the condition.

Diagnosis

To diagnose accessory navicular syndrome, the foot and ankle surgeon will ask about symptoms and examine the foot, looking for skin irritation or swelling. The doctor may press on the bony prominence to assess the area for discomfort. Foot structure, muscle strength, joint motion, and the way the patient walks may also be evaluated. X-rays are usually ordered to confirm the diagnosis. If there is ongoing pain or inflammation, an MRI or other advanced imaging tests may be used to further evaluate the condition.

Non Surgical Treatment

For less severe symptoms, decreasing or modifying activity, such as avoiding aggravating activities, may suffice. Ice and NSAIDS can be used to help control pain. An arch support or an orthotics may help to stabilize the arch during this time. When rubbing on the bump causes pain, a doughnut pad can be worn. Exercises to increase range of motion and improve movement should still be used.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment

If non-operative treatment fails to relieve the patient’s symptoms, surgical intervention may be warranted. The standard operative treatment of an accessory navicular is a Kidner procedure. However, if surgery is undertaken it is important that it address the underlying source of the patients pain.